IVWG Q & A Collection

This is the collected Question and Answer articles from previous Guild Members and contributors, we have collected them together into a single article that is open to the general public to help educate people and dispel some of the myths about Violet Wands.

This content was edited by Vonkelso to increase the accuracy of the answers, or in some cases make the questions clearer.

QuestionWhat is a Violet Wand?

Answer:  Violet wands are a relatively new invention, though their grandparents began their lives as medical devices in the early 1900s. Like other ‘inventions’ of the same time period, they were marketed with over-exaggerated claims. Later, they were ‘discovered’ by the sexually adventurous for their amazing range of sensations they were capable of providing. The same companies that invented violet wands, invented vibrators (which were also used for ‘medical’ purposes originally). Statistically, violet wands are the safest electric sex toy next to vibrators, and you can do a whole lot more with them! The vintage type of violet wand (violet ray devices) are no longer manufactured the same way, and the two technologies have diverged in recent years. You can still go to a beauty salon and find a modern violet ray device used to give you a facial, but it feels nothing like a violet wand!


QuestionHow do Wands work?

Answer:  Ordinary household electricity is a low frequency alternating current (120 Volts, 60 Hz in the US) and is hazardous to come into direct contact with. The Violet Wand “transforms” the household voltage high current by a two-stage process with a magnetic resonator and then a capacitor (known in combination as a Tesla coil) into a low watt, sub-milli-amperage, and high frequency charge that has little effect on the human body. The vacuum annealed, heat treated glass electrodes are filled with argon (and sometimes other gas) under low pressure, that creates the purple glow when it is excited by electricity. The glass electrodes also effectively isolate the charge within. What comes off the end of the glass electrodes behaves as direct current electricity that jumps to an uncharged source. The electrical charge you receive from a glass violet wand electrode is similar to static electricity that you receive a shock from when walking across a carpeted floor. The difference is that violet wands produce a continuous stream of electrical charge rather than a single static spark.


QuestionIs a Violet Wand safe?

Answer: Violet wands are one the safest electric sex toys, with the fewest statistical injuries reported. However, you do have to take simple safety precautions, like keeping the wand from getting wet, just like any electrical appliance and avoiding use on people with health risks.


QuestionWhat does a Violet Wand feel like

Answer:  They pretty much feel like a jolt of static electricity, or they can feel like you are in an seltzer bath, with the sparks fizzing lushly over your skin, all the way up to sharp shocks. There is a wide range of physical sensations you can achieve, depending on the setting, technique used and accessories, So they can feel like soft bubbles or like a knife cutting.


QuestionWhy does my wand cut out if I turn it upside down or sideways?

Answer:  The magnets inside the coil shift inside the wand. Change the angle position of the violet wand to correct this. The ideal position is straight up and down, as this angle changes the magnets shift and the wand “slows down”.  You can compensate by changing the angle or turning the power up.


QuestionI am having a problem with electricity arcing from the wand why is this happening?

Answer:  The electrical charge from a violet wand will naturally seek to arc to the nearest conductive matter, which just may happen to be your own skin. Hold the violet wand handset at its base, keeping your hand from where the handset begins to narrow at the nose cone. Also make sure your electrodes are seated securely. You may also want to turn your adjustment strength down. These will substantially reduce excess electricity.  The nose cone is the “business” end of the Wand where power output is at its highest. If you get too close to it, it will arc to you as you are the shortest point to ground in that area.


Question: Why is my wand losing power?

Answer:  Typically overheating. Most wands used a capacitor (the mythic ‘core’ you may have heard about) which will eventually lose power over time if they overheat. (ALL wands, regardless of the materials used for their internal components, will wear out over time.) Use your violet wand only for the recommended amount of time 15-20 minutes for mechanical wands. If extended play is something you want, choose a vintage two-piece unit or a NEW wand; they run longer.


QuestionWhy won’t a specific Electrode work? (It doesn’t appear to be broken)

Answer:  Try this: Insert the electrode and turn the adjustment setting all the way up. Shift the angle that you are holding the wand. If the electrode comes on it just needed to ‘warm up’ and you can now adjust the setting down as desired. Also try touching the electrode to your hand while it is at full power. If the electrode still refuses to work, it may have developed a small leak and the gas has escaped. If that’s the case, it can’t be repaired.


QuestionWhy are some Electrodes different colors?

Answer:  Just like neon signs use different gases to glow different colors, so do violet wand electrodes. Violet wand glass electrodes, in fact, glow for the very same reason that neon signs do; noble gas is excited by the electricity and it glows. At other times the electrodes have actually been made with different colored glass.  The color to gas matrix is below.

Helium – Pink
Neon – Orange
Argon – Purple
Krypton – Grey/White
Xenon – Blue


QuestionDo some light bulbs produce x-rays with a wand?

Answer:  No. Some small household light bulbs have sufficient vacuum that the glass has a greenish glow (fluoresces) when used with a violet wand. When this happens, they are producing cathode rays, and it is the same thing happening that causes CRT computer monitors or older television screens to glow. Cathode rays produced by older televisions and monitors can cause a Geiger Counter to tick, just like the smaller household light bulbs will with a wand and when reading their cathode rays, but neither of these are dangerous. However, you -can- get x-rays from a violet wand — but to do that, you need a -very- high vacuum tube, such as the antique radio vacuum tubes found in very old radios and televisions. Again, it will have to be a very high vacuum. It can be done with these antique tubes, but no light bulbs have this type of very high vacuum.


Question: What are the differences between the one and two piece vintage Wand units?

Answer:  In terms of how they work, nothing. Two piece vintage units have an indefinite running time, and one piece units are easier to move with. It is solely a personal preference which wand is right for you.


QuestionWhat about getting an old or vintage Wand?

Answer:  Many of the wand flea-market finds have had their components deteriorating in a damp basement for 20 years, or their wiring pitted and brittle from the high voltages and have therefore become dangerous to use. You wouldn’t want to use those wands “as is.” IF you want to risk using an old wand, be sure to have its wiring checked completely by a qualified person,  also you can consider purchasing a reconditioned vintage wand that has been checked for safety.


QuestionHow safe is it to use metal accessories and electrodes

Answer:   Electrical theory demonstrates that IF you are using an un-gapped metal accessory inserted into a wand that does not have a safety spark gap AND the internal wiring fails, there is a chance that there would be a subsequent draw on the line current. This could be a lethal occurrence. While this has not been documented (nor rumored) to have happened in 70 years of violet wand history, there is still a chance it COULD happen if those circumstances occurred. It’s safest to play with the glass electrodes, spark-gapped metal electrode accessories, or make sure your wand has an internal safety spark gap. If a spark gap is present in neither your wand nor your metal accessory, there is a slight increase in actual statistical risk that you should fully understand before making the choice to play with those circumstances. SSC players will stick to metal accessories that have a spark gap of some type..this can even be an air gap, the poor connections between ball chain links, or a resistant spacer. RACK proponents will understand the additional risk involved with ungapped metal accessories.


Question: Is it true you can’t use a Violet Wand above the waist

Answer:  You definitely can use most violet wands above the waist. Violet wands are the safest electrical play toys out there, both clinically and statistically. But there are a few older types available, where it really depends on you and the wand. Some violet wands are approved by the FDA for use on humans and are indicated for usage just about anywhere, including the head and face. If you don’t know which type of vintage wand you have, then you may wish to restrict its use to below the rib-cage.


Question:  I’ve heard that old Violet Wands aren’t safe to use. What’s the story?

Answer:  Older wands are no less safe to use than old lamps that are in excellent condition, but you wouldn’t use a 70-year old lamp without having it re-wired and checked for safety. Neither should you use an old violet wand without doing the same! One leg of a violet wand circuit remains connected to household A/C, which has the potential to deliver lethal amperage if something goes wrong. Never use a wand whose metal parts inside or out, show signs of rust or deterioration. Deterioration on the outside, means deterioration on the inside metal parts too…including the wiring. Vintage violet wands are made of Bakelite, which is and always has been a very effective insulator. Internal spark gaps are present that halt household line current. The neat thing about the coils in violet wands is, even if they do malfunction, they can’t send their electrical charge any farther than the inside of the glass electrode! Yes, new professional wands have built-in grounded circuits and older ones do not, but this actually does not create a significant difference in safety. If this remains a concern for you, the purchase of an inexpensive ground fault circuit interrupter to plug in between your pre-owned wand and the wall outlet should do the trick nicely.


QuestionWhat are the differences between a collectible Violet Wand and a new one?

Answer:  Pre-owned wands are not for everyone. But then neither are new ones. Cost factors and aesthetics, personal preferences and level of usage will all be different for everyone. There is a classic look and feel to pre-owned and vintage wands that is not captured in the new ones, and persons with more aesthetic tastes will opt for the one-of-a-kind wands as collectible items as well as toys to play with. And like classic versus new cars, what new violet wands make up for in mileage, they lose in power. If you are accustomed to new wands, you will find vintage wands pack a more powerful punch, but new wands have more features.


Famous Quotes

"Our virtues and out failings are inseparable like force and matter. When they separate, man is not more. -Nikola Tesla"

Author: Papa-Bear-Tony

Papa-Bear, electric meanie, skills presenter, kink educator, and coffee fiend often found in the presence of freaks. Feed at your own risk.

2 thoughts on “IVWG Q & A Collection

  1. I purchased an old wand IXU 1930’s, but after 10 minutes it gets warm and starts to lose power, I notice the coil within the adjustment unit is getting warm, the capacitor is a 100nf polypropolyne-which stays cool, but the handle also gets warm. Would you say this unit has a problem and do I suspect the handle or warming coil first?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *