Violet Wand Myths by Dralion

Original Author : Dralion / Date : 2005-06-12 02:16

Violet Wand Myths

Myths about violet wands and other forms of electrical play abound. Some are the result of old information that keeps getting passed along, and some are the result of misunderstanding, conjecture, or other lack of knowledge. We’re sure you’ve run into some of them yourself. But here are the major MYTHS, and then the facts, straight from the horses’ mouths.

Myth #1–The Biggest Violet wand myth– Ceramic core wands are better quality over wax core wands.
This myth was started in the mid 1990s by a violet wand distributor who wanted to increase sales of their particular model. The fact is, that the term ‘core’ is misused. In their basic setup, wands consist of two electrical coils, a capacitor and a rheostat. Without getting too technical, the capacitor is is actually the part that was being referred to as either wax or ceramic. In fact, wand capacitors can be made out of many different materials, such as polymers, natural or synthetic resins, wax, ceramic, mylar, glass, etc. Each of the different types of capacitors have different properties.

Wax capacitor wands have a capacitor that consists of two metal foil plates separated by a long length of waxed paper. (about 10 feet, rolled up.) This type of capacitor very effectively stores the violet wand electricity so that it builds up to arc between the plates and continue on to the second electrical coil. If used too long in the same time period, the sparking between the foil plates builds up heat, which melts the wax off the paper. This begins to break down the capacitor, and if this occurs too often, the capacitor won’t be able to ‘charge’ the wand, and no electrical discharge will occur. The wand has ‘burned out’. Wax capacitor wands are no less quality items than wands using ceramic or mylar or polymer capacitors, but they need to be used a little differently. They merely must be allowed to cool completely after each 10-15 minutes of use.

Ceramic capacitor wands perform the same way, but the capacitor is made out of a sliver of porcelain between the two plates. These enable the wands to operate longer periods of time, but the fail-safe of the wax capacitor is removed. Instead, when a ceramic capacitor wand ‘burns out’ the coil fails instead of the capacitor. All wands will wear out eventually in this fashion, as that much voltage and high frequency electricity passing through components will cause them to weaken over time.

The different capacitors in wands have different properties, and mylar capacitors produce the weakest charge. These are used in the milder ‘erotic’ wands which have a lesser output. This way the mylar capacitors will last longer, as mylar is also subject to burn-out over time.

The best capacitors are self-healing polymer capacitors. When these experience a surge of current that is too high, they actually melt a small amount where the spark passes through. Then the tiny melted segment cools almost immediately and re-solidifies, making the capacitor whole once again. This puts the burden on the capacitor instead of the coil, and this type of wand has the longest overall ‘life’.

The old violet wand company who first called the capacitors ‘cores’, promoted their marketing ploy a little too well, and the myth has become an undying urban legend. But the fact of the matter is, violet wands don’t have ‘cores’ of any material, as their cores actually consist of a bundle of thin metal rods in the magnet coil. And even ‘ceramic’ capacitor wands may have a large quantity of wax as insulating material inside them.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Myth #2–This one tries harder–Violet wand electricity doesn’t penetrate the skin

This myth comes to us courtesy of unknowing violet wand distributors relying on outdated, old high voltage research (circa 1950-1960s). Again, a now-defunct violet wand company wanted to market their wands, and needed to convince everyone of the safety of their product. They turned to some outdated High voltage/high frequency research that was published in the 1950s-1960s, that stated that electricity of this type didn’t penetrate the skin. The old research cited a complicated physics/electrical engineering formula that determines the ‘skin effect’ of conductive materials. This formula is actually known as the ‘skin effect’ formula, but never was intended to refer to ‘human skin’. The out-of-business wand dealer just didn’t know any better what it actually WAS referring to. Rather, if the ‘skin effect formula’ applies to the surface ‘skin’ of metal or other material that electricity would penetrate at full strength, before dropping down to a fraction of its original strength. The research publications themselves were a problem, as they depended upon figures for results that had originally been miscalculated. That old erroneous research has long since been replaced and corrected, but the myth still remains.

The most up-to-date high voltage/ high frequency research has relied on a number of separate sets of findings by different Journeyman or Master members of the Violet Wand Guild. The results were produced in several different ways to show that violet wand electricity freely penetrates the skin of human beings.

These involved:

-re-publication of the original scientific data to correct skin effect data in high voltage/high frequency applications
-recalculations of the ‘skin effect’ formula based on the corrections, and using human data rather than data for metal
-a series of non-related sets of practical experiments done by different researchers
-independent ‘hobbyist’ experiments in support of the research findings
-and knowledge gained through practical application

Finally, as a way to test the numerical findings, in 2003 the Violet Wand Guild, with help from Eclectic Electric, funded a university research grant that tested violet wand electricity on dead pigs.

All supported the same conclusions: some violet wand current passes through human skin. However, little is known about how it travels through the body, except that it follows the paths of least electrical resistance (freely travelling nerves and blood vessels while blocked by bone) while it tries to get to ground.

But as scientific as new research might be, and as grateful as we are that the old errors were finally corrected, its still not as good as practical application.

There’s a MUCH easier way for you yourself to check whether vw electricity can pass through human skin. Wrap your arm tightly (to simulate the skin attached tightly to flesh underneath) in a layer of leather, and try to zap yourself through it. You will feel the electricity quite well! Then wrap your arm a second time, adding another layer of leather, and try again. Every time you feel the violet wand electricity coming through the leather, add another layer of leather. It will be quite sometime and a good number of layers of cow, elk or goat skin, before you’re able to keep violet wand electricity from passing through the ‘skin’ you made. Once you can no longer feel the violet wand electricity, count the number of layers of leather skin, unwrap your arm, and measure all the number of layers together. Human skin measures about 6 millimeters to .5 millimeters in thickness depending on where it is on your body…but even at its thickest, human skin is thinner than the violet wand stopping ‘skin’ you just made. Since human skin is a lot thinner and is less resistant than the tanned, dry, leather artificial skin you just made, it can be easily shown vw electricity passes through thinner human skin quite easily, to travel in the flesh beneath.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Myth #3–Outdated information–Above the waist is always a no-no

That you shouldn’t use electricy above the waist, is a good, general rule of thumb for beginners. It ensures that you won’t get in over your head. However, to say that you should NEVER do it, is a myth that’s more than a bit outdated.

Violet wands aside, (as they are the safest form of electrical play and the below-the-waist-rule never did apply to them), electricity play has changed a lot in the past 20, 10, or even 5 years. Think of how computers have changed in that time! Thankfully, technology in the toy industry also has progressed as well, even if it hasn’t done so to the quite the same extent as computers! If we talk about the ‘old days’ of electricity play, we are looking at train transformers, stereo speakers, car batteries, and other electrical items that just are NOT made to use on a human being. Even the machines that WERE produced for humans were entirely different than they are today. Vintage stimulators used to cause muscle contractions actually used Radio tubes, just like the televisions of the time did. These stimulators were quite different than the EMS units you can get anywhere now. Unlike those of the past, take a look at any tv info-mercial for an EMS muscle stimulator device and you’ll see they are using them on chest muscles. Thank goodness for progress!

Today, rather than rigging your stereo speakers or train transformers (though you can still do that), companies are producing isolated devices that are specifically made for erotic purposes. The minimum amount of risk for the maximum amount of pleasure is everyone’s gain. Beginners, by all means, should stick with using electrical toys below the waist. But please don’t become upset with the heavy players who do know what they are doing, know the device they are using, and choose to work above the waist. It just means a difference in experience and education.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Myth #4–Its just a matter of information–Electricity play is dangerous

Anything can be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing, but it doesn’t take much education to know what you’re doing with a violet wand. In five minutes you can know enough to be playing safely with a violet wand. Its the lack of understanding how they work, how to use them, and what NOT to do, that keeps people from enjoying all the sensations they can provide. There are only a few types of electrical toys; type A (vibrators, massagers, and other ‘motor’ driven electrical toys), type I (violet wands), type II (TENS and EMS or similar units), type III (stereo, train and other transformer ‘stims’) type IV (electric fences, flyswatters, dog collars and livestock prods) and type V (stun guns and tasers.) TENS and EMS units have medical counterparts that you can buy from info-mercials. You can use those EMS/TENS devices that are marketed as medical ‘massagers’ or ‘pain relievers’ or buy them from companies that manufacture them specifically for sexual purposes. (complete with sexually specific accessories.)

Every electrical toy from electric flyswatters, to cattle prods and stun guns, always has some risk, but aren’t inherently ‘dangerous’. Stun guns and taser guns, which produce higher voltage than any of the other electrical toys mentioned above, are the most ‘dangerous’. While they are most often used with NO treatable injuries, sometimes they inflict minor burns, or create injuries caused by falling after being hit by the stun gun or taser. In the years they have been used in the US since their development, only 3 significant injuries solely and directly from the use of stun guns/tasers have been documented; a pregnant woman miscarried in 1992 after being hit with a Taser, a 7month old infant died after abuse with a stun gun, and a Virginia prison inmate who was repeatedly shocked with a stun gun also died. They aren’t a problem for adults in good health when they are not abused. Though as with all electrical toys, none should be used on persons with heart disease, heart arrythmia, or with a pacemaker.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-
Myth #5–Purple Haze–Violet Wands produce Ultraviolet Light–

Even though they are sometimes erroneously called ‘Ultraviolet wands’, wands don’t produce Ultraviolet light. The purple glow you see is caused by the gas inside the electrode being excited by the electricity, and it is purple because of the gas, not ultraviolet. (If it were ultraviolet, you wouldn’t see it anyway.)

Violet wands DO produce full-spectrum light at the point of spark, which includes a minute amount of UV. This is almost too low to measure, as the amount of full-spectrum light produced by the spark itself is very, very small. A hanger-on to this myth is that unintentional burns can be caused by the ultraviolet light produced by the spark. The amount of UV at point of spark is far too tiny; the burns (accidental or intentional) are caused by the 50,000 volts of electricity; an electrical burn rather than a UV burn.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Myth #6–Put away your GE oven–Violet Wands produce radio frequency waves–

We’re not sure this should be included, in the event that the explanation causes more confusion than the myth. We’ve only heard this myth rarely, but even once is too often. The myth is that violet wands give off radio frequency waves similar to a microwave, which is why they can burn.

That’s not the case. Violet wands do produce ozone. (still within OSHA guidelines unless you use them repeatedly for prolonged periods.) Violet wands do produce an electromagnetic field. (if you leave them plugged in but turned the whole way down so they appear to be off. If you either turn them up so they are working, or unplug them, the EM field disappears. Ask us why this occurs if you like, its an interesting tech discussion.) Violetwands do produce a minute amount of ultraviolet light as part of the full-spectrum light at the point of spark. And violet wands do produce electricity that cycles at a frequency which would correspond to a ‘medium’ radio frequency range.

Violet wands do NOT produce ultraviolet light from their glass tubes or the purple glow. And violet wands do not produce microwave, or diathermy emissions. (though medical diathermy machines CAN produce violet rays.) Contrary to what everyone (including us) calls them, violet wands actually only operate at around 500 khz, which is really not high frequency at all, but is categorized as medium frequency oscillation. True, its how fast they are cycling as the internal spark pulses back and forth, but you aren’t going to pick up any aircraft distress signals. (500 khz is the international distress signal frequency for ships and aircraft out on the ocean.) And you wont get microwaved by using one.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

Myth #7–Violet wands produce static electricity–

No. And yes. Static electricity is a high voltage, low current electrical net charge. A violet wand has a high voltage, low current net charge, but its not quite as low as what we think of when we think of static electricity. However, a violet wand’s net charge has properties in common with BOTH static and current electricity. A good argument can be made for both.

The truth is, violet wands produce electromagnetic energy.

Author: IVWG

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *